#Accessibility Options

Looking for  Legal Help? 
Information About the Courts Going to Court on Your Own? Learn about Access to Justice projects around the country Support for Self Help Providers
For eligible low-income recipients, legal aid in non-criminal cases may be available at no cost by applying online at www.nhlegalaid.org or call 800-639-5290. Applicants will be screened and referred to either NH Legal Assistance, Pro Bono or LARC.

Provides legal information, advice and referrals to low income people in civil matters, especially those involving basic needs of family law, food, shelter, income, and medical care. If you do not know where to turn for legal help, call LARC.

If you seek assistance with foreclosure with any provider at any income level, please call the Foreclosure Relief Project at (toll free) 877-399-9995 or apply online at www.nhlegalaid.org.


NHLA provides free legal advice and representation to low-income people in civil matters especially those involving basic needs, such as food, shelter, income and medical care, as well as domestic violence.

Pro Bono Referral Program: Connects low-income citizens with volunteer lawyers for services in family law, bankruptcy, consumer, housing and senior citizen matters. Low-income Taxpayer Project: Volunteer lawyers assist clients with federal income tax disputes Law Line: Volunteer lawyers provide free legal advice by telephone. DOVE (Domestic Violence Emergency Project): provides free legal representation at final hearings for protective orders.

Assists low-income clients with issues including consumer protection, worker's compensation, landlord-tenant and bankruptcy.

Provides information, referrals, legal advice and legal representation for citizens with disabilities.
Low-cost or reduced rate legal services in non-criminal cases is also available to eligible low-income recipients:

Provides attorney referrals for those who can afford to pay for legal services.

Connects low income citizens with reduced rate lawyers.
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An 80-year-old woman, suffering from dementia and living in an assisted care facility, was notified in 2006 that, 10 years earlier, she had been overpaid in Social Security benefits.
The government wanted her to return the money.

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